Little Craft Pop Up!

Popup Shops, Updates

I will be joining Little Craft Pop-Up to help celebrate Luma’s 5th Anniversary this Friday October 13th, 12:30pm – 3:30pm downtown Santa Cruz.

I will be stocking my Kangaroo Collection of practical but stylish unisex pants, shorts and t-shirts for kids made from up-cycled clothing.

Come celebrate with us!

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Ironing plastic bags

Projects, Tutorials

This week I picked up a quilting panel to be made into a cloth book for the wee boy (The Pokey Little Puppy). He likes crinkly pages so instead of using batting to line the pages decided to use plastic bags, but I had to iron them first.

No, really, I had to iron them first. I found a tutorial years ago (my link is long gone) where someone ironed plastic grocery bags together to make a stronger plastic fabric and figured this would work perfectly for my needs. Thicker (better crinkle), more durable (it’s going in the washing machine at some point) plastic interlining that doesn’t require a trip to the fabric store.

Here’s how I did it:
I used two bags flattened and smoothed out together. I placed them between two pieces of scrap muslin (the inks used to print the backs can sometimes transfer so I recommend using scrap fabric) and turned my iron to the cotton/hottest setting and turned off the steam. You want the iron hot since you are actually trying to melt the plastic.
Slowly iron the bags through the fabric trying to use consistent speed and pressure. You will likely be able to hear the plastic melting and contracting as you iron. Give it a minute to cool before moving the fabric to check on it otherwise the plastic may stick a bit. If it isn’t melted thoroughly just cover it back up and try again. It’s pretty forgiving that way. The end result is a paper like plastic that now can be used for what you want. In my case a baby book.

Project Post – Leftover Skirt, a tutorial

Projects, Tutorials

I have been using the project feature of the Threadbias.com site and really enjoying being able to track my projects. Periodically I will be posting copies here.

After finishing the Sweet Pea Dress I had bit of swaddle left so I decided to make a skirt for the little girl.

Fabric: leftover Aden & Anais swaddle and leftover brown slug jersey from the A&A Sweet Pea Dress

Pattern: a bunch of rectangles. Not very exact or anything but this is what I did.
Waistband – Hip plus ease wide x desired (what looked right) hight. I folded the whole thing in half to make the elastic casing.
Skirt – max hight x max length I could get out of the remnant of swaddle, I then cut it in half so pocket could be added in the side seams.
Pockets – what I could get that would fit a child’s hand folded in half.
Skirt lining – same hight as skirt minus about 1/2″ x hip plus ease.

Sewing: Prep sewing – instead of serging I folded the short edge of the skirt and the pocket opening edges of the pockets for a clean finish. (I don’t have my serger set up yet and didn’t what to have to do so). I then did a french seam on the bottom of the pockets ending 1/2″ from the open edge.
Adding pockets – I seamed the open edge of the pockets to the side seams with at 3/8″ SA and the under stitched the SA to the pocket. Next it sewed the side seams with a 1/2″ SA.
Waist band – I seamed the single seam with 1/2″ SA making a tube. I then folded it in half. And place the seamed elastic inside.
Joining the two – I used a double line of gathering to match the skirt to the waist band. I then basted the two together with a 3/8″ SA. This just kept things more stable and manageable to put the lining in.
Lining – I seamed the single seam making a tube. I then seamed it to the waistband/skirt combo with a 1/2″ SA. I kept the SA facing down towards the lining and under stitched it in place.

Project Post – A&A Sweet Pea swaddle dress

Projects

I have been using the project feature of the Threadbias.com site and really enjoying being able to track my projects. Periodically I will be posting copies here.

The wee boy is getting bigger and not needing all his Aden and Anais swaddles so I decided to make something else out of them. The fabric is lovely and they are a good size blanket giving me plenty of yardage to work with. Although the Sweet Pea dress is a dress it also works nicely as a tunic top. It has raglan sleeves and an easy fit which seems quite fitting for the lightness of the fabric. It also allows for a lot of flexibility in sizing. My daughter wore the ones I made her for quite a long time.

Pattern: Sweet Pea Dress – on Threadbias (Also available on Etsy)
 
Fabric: Aden & Anais monkey print swaddle, brown slub jersey
 
Prep: Since I’ve washed the swaddle a few times it has developed this nice waffle texture, great for a blanket but not so good for cutting so ironing it first. I’m also removing the A&A tags so they can be added back as a reminder of where the fabric came from.

Cutting: The swaddles are not very stable so I like to use underlay to keep it from shifting around. The trick to using underlay is to use a paper that is more stable then the one you are cutting. I’m using jersey for the band and to make things simple I’m putting on the fusing before I cut the pieces out. Both have to be cut anyways just this way the jersey is stablized before cutting instead of after.

I guess I have to get my sewing machine set up, something I haven’t done yet since moving.

Sewing: Even though I wrote the instructions I’m still having to follow them since it’s been a while since I last made one of these dresses. A trick for sewing fused placket facings: if you want a clean finish on the open edge, seam the fusing to the facing along that edge (wrong side and glue side out) and fold glue side in before ironing. The seam allowance ends up under the fusing leaving a nice clean edge. (see the picture.)
To cut down on how flouncy the pleats are, (this dress if for a boy,) I tacked the pleats for the first 1 1/4″ leaving 3/4″ visible once the band is on.
I opted to use french seam since the fabric is so light (serging may just pull out), makes for a soft inside and gives it a heirloom feel.
I stay stitched the edge of the band facing to make it easier to fold and more stable.

Finishing: I finished it with elasticized sleeve hem, a wide bottom hem and snap closures.

Want to see what I did with the leftover fabric? Check out the Leftovers skirt, a tutorial.